Tredici

Game and Rules by Jordon Kalilich
Official Rules version 1.6 - November 3, 2003
Copyright © 2003 Jordon Kalilich. This file may be freely published and redistributed so long as this copyright information and the official URL listed below remain intact.

http://www.theworldofstuff.com/tredici/

Object of the Game: The object of Tredici (pronounced "tre-DEE-chee") is to collect all of the cards of one suit before the other players.

Number of Players: 2 to 4 players

Cards: French-suited cards (hearts, spades, diamonds, and clubs) are recommended. However, any four-suited deck with thirteen cards per suit will work. The cards and suits are not specifically ranked in Tredici, and extra cards such as Jokers are not used.

Setup: Choose a player to deal and have them deal seven cards to each player. The remaining cards create the drawing deck, which is placed in the middle of the table. During gameplay, players place their discarded cards in the discard deck, which is created next to the drawing deck. (It's important that players can distinguish between the drawing deck and the discard deck. It is recommended that you make one stand out from the other - make the discard deck messy, for example.)

After the cards are dealt and the drawing deck is created, each player secretly chooses a "target suit" which they will try to collect all the cards from. Take the cards of your target suit from your hand and place them face-down in front of you. The cards you collect throughout the game are organized into four stacks of three cards each (always face-down), with the fifth stack consisting of one card. Complete a stack before you start the next one. The stacks are simply for easier counting of your and others' cards.

Playing the Game: After the cards are dealt and each player has set aside the cards of their suit, gameplay begins. The player to the left of the dealer goes first, and play passes clockwise. Each player takes their first turn drawing the same number of cards they put down before play began. Then, if you have any cards of your target suit at that time, you add them to your stacks. Then it is the next player's turn. And so play continues around, with each player drawing the number of cards that they set aside in the previous turn.

If your hand does not contain any cards of your target suit, on your next turn you must discard three cards from your hand, place them in the discard deck (creating one if necessary), and draw three new cards. When the drawing deck becomes exhausted, the discard deck becomes the drawing deck. The dealer or another player may shuffle the discard deck before it is used as the drawing deck.

If you draw an ace that is not of your target suit, on your next turn you must discard your entire hand and draw a new one.

Kisché: A kisché (pronounced "kee-SHAY") occurs when a player suspects that another player or players are trying for the same target suit as they are. If you suspect this, you may call "kisché." Kisché may only be called once per game. When kisché is called, each player announces their target suit. If another player is, in fact, trying for the same target suit, that player must discard their hand and all of the cards in their stacks and secretly choose a new target suit that no one else is using (if possible). This is called purging. If the player calling kisché is wrong and no one else is trying for their target suit, they must do this (except in the special kischés described below).

Triple kisché: Three players have the same target suit. The two with kisché called against them must purge.

Passive kisché: One player calls kisché and no one has their target suit, but two other players have the same target suit. Both players with the same target suit must purge.

Triple passive kisché: One player calls kisché and no one has their target suit, but three other players have the same target suit. All three of those players must purge.

Double (passive) kisché: A player calls kisché and someone else has their target suit. In addition, the two other players have the same target suit. All three players with kisché called against them must purge.

Nimöglich (pronounced "nee-MO-gleek"): Both or all players have the same target suit. The one(s) with kisché called against them must purge.

Running Out of Cards: Running out of cards is likely to happen in a three-player game and almost inevitable in a four-player game, but it only adds to the excitement. If both the drawing deck and the discard deck run out of cards, each player removes a card from their hand to create a new drawing deck. This continues every time the decks run out of cards. Therefore, the size of a full hand decreases from seven to six to five, and so on. (The number of cards discarded and drawn if you have no cards of your target suit still remains at three.) If all players have only one card left in their hands and no one has won yet, the game is a draw.

Winning the Game: The first player to collect all thirteen cards of their target suit and call "tredici" wins the game.

For More Than Four Players: Tredici can be played with more than four players by having players group into teams. If a prime number of people (5, 7, 11, 13, etc.) are playing, the teams will be lopsided; therefore, this is not recommended unless agreed upon by all players. Six players could form two teams of three players each or three teams of two players each, eight players could form two teams of four players each or four teams of two players each, nine players would form three teams of three, and so on. There may not be more than four teams playing a game. If the game has eight or more players, the number of cards in a hand is reduced to the highest possible number. Players should sit next to other teammates.

Before play begins, teams decide on their target suit and which player their stacks will be in front of. Each player takes their turn individually, and when they have cards of their target suit, they place them in their team's stacks. The ace rule applies to individual players only, not teams. An individual may call kisché on an opposing team with their own team's consent. When kisché is called on a team, all members of that team discard the cards in their hands along with their team's stacks.